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Slave Research in Bibles

Slave Research in Bibles

Slave Research in bibles might sound counter-intuitive, but this post illustrates why it should not. The Tennessee State Archives and Library (TSLA) just finished digitizing and uploading hundred of bibles in their collection. The files are organized by surname. I hope that more genealogists will submit copies of family information from their family bibles. Aside from that, there […]

Freedmens Bureau Labor Contracts

Freedmens Bureau Labor Contracts

Familysearch is quickly digitizing Freedmens Bureau Records. Labor Contracts are one of the first categories of records that researchers should search within these valuable records. I posted awhile ago a suggested process to follow while searching these exasperating records. Background and Importance Labor Contracts are very valuable because they were often made between slaveowners and their former enslaved […]

Finding the Garrard Slaveholder

Finding the Garrard Slaveholder

Finding the Garrard slaveowner for my great-grandmother Mary Garrett is a fascinating case for study. She married John Wesley Holt and they settled in Hardin County, TN and raised a large family. Mary was from neighboring Decatur County. Her mother’s death certificate (also named Mary) identified her parents as Mason and Rachel Garrett. The 1870/1880 […]

Mind of the Slaveowner: Runaway Ads

Mind of the Slaveowner: Runaway Ads

Runaway Ads for enslaved people throughout Maryland are available online at the  Maryland State Archives’ Legacy of Slavery database. The ads tell us much about the mind of the slaveowner. Here are some of my observations: 1) Slaveowners knew a surprising amount of information about enslaved families. This also speaks to the extended kinship communities that […]

Tracing Enslaved Ancestors Through Proba...

Tracing Enslaved Ancestors Through Probate

Inventoried Slaves For those of us descended from enslaved ancestors, we are taught to research probate records early in the process. They can be used to verify slaveownership. If the slaveowner died before 1865, we may find our ancestors named in their will or listed in their inventories. As we advance in our skills, however, […]

 
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